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Replay Date - October 18, 1969.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

I've designed this web site for a screen resolution of 800 x 600. This replay is a continuation from my replay of the 1971 season, albeit a step back in time. This replay is done by using Baseball for Windows 5.0 by Miller Associates, Inc. With the use of the League Play function, I am replaying this season with help of a friend, Ed Johnson, who is playing the role of Ted Williams managing the Washington Senators. I am donning the cap of Luman Harris and have grabbed the reigns of the Atlanta Braves. Also, we will both play other series of interest during the season.
     For those of you familiar with the game, I imported the teams from BJE and am using the "Shifting 60's" schedule disk from Miller. 1960's micromanager, Hack Gilbert II, is the computer manager, and all trades and transactions take place on the actual dates. Beginning July 29 of the replay, Los Angeles is managed by Matt Jackson, and as of June 10, Baltimore is managed by Mike Bright. Since April 25th of the replay, the lineups used are the actual lineups. AIM is set at fatigue only because by using actual lineups, all injuries will take place as they did in real life.
    
Thanks for visiting, and hope you enjoy this site!
Please send me your comments!

Check out a preview of my
1947 replay - When All Hell Broke Loose in Baseball.

to be started once this replay is complete.

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IN MEMORY OF:
Jim "Catfish" Hunter
1946 - 1999
Hall of Fame, 1987
1969 Replay Results:
12-12; 4.12 ERA; 35 GS

MIRACLE METS ARE CHAMPS!
Comeback kids stun Goliath O's with dramatic rally

BALTIMORE, October 18 – Two seasons ago, the Boston Red Sox rode the "Impossible Dream" to an American League championship. Well, don’t pinch Gil Hodges and his New York Mets as they are now living the "preposterous dream". The Mets captured their first world’s championship with a dramatic come-from-behind 6-3 victory over the Baltimore Orioles in Game 6 of the 1969 World Series. Tommie Agee hit a two-run and eventual game-winning homer in the top of the eighth.

69tseaver.jpg (8401 bytes)
Tom Seaver was named Most Valuable Player of the Series by winning two games, including the second no-hitter in Series history.

 

Oriole starter Jim Palmer was coasting toward a deciding Game 7 by allowing only one hit to New York through six innings. But with one out in the seventh, Cleon Jones belted a long drive over CF Paul Blair for a stand-up double. Art Shamsky followed with a drive over the right field wall to cut the Baltimore lead to one run. Shamsky circled the bases in an eerie stillness as Memorial Stadium was quieted by the clout. Manager Earl Weaver relieved a stunned Palmer with bullpen ace Pete Richert who retired the side. However with one out in the eighth, Bud Harrelson drew an innocent walk from Richert. Pinch-hitter Ron Swoboda was retired on strikes, and Agee stepped up to bat. Agee swung at a letter high fastball. Don Buford stepped in, then drifted back to the warning track and watched the ball disappear. Those swings by Shamsky and Agee put Baltimore in a position that this 112 win team had never been all season – total desperation. In a simple matter of moments, Baltimore plunged from Palmer working on a one-hitter with a three run lead to abruptly being six outs from season’s brink. Eddie Watt replaced Richert in the ninth. But, he provided no relief with a pair of passes to Jones and Ken Boswell. Donn Clendenon brought the pair home with a drive past Boog Powell at first. Frank Robinson corralled the ball in the right field corner. Clendenon raced around second base, and beat the relay throw with a sliding triple. As the crowd scattered for the exits, Clendenon’s triple brought the 1969 World Series to a close.

Baltimore had that crowd at a feverish roar by taking an early three run lead. Don Buford singled home Elrod Hendricks and Jim Palmer, who doubled over third base, in the second inning off rookie Gary Gentry. Boog Powell added another run in the fourth with a RBI single beyond the range of Ken Boswell at second base. As Shamsky chased the ball down in right, Powell chugged toward second drawing a cut off throw from Ed Kranepool. Powell beat the throw, and Buford scored the O's third run. Gil Hodges then turned to his bullpen which held the Oriole attack to a single hit in the final five innings. Youngster Nolan Ryan set the Orioles down with a perfect two innings to earn the win. Coincidentally, it was New York who was limited to one hit in the initial stages of the game. But in the final analysis, it was the end that matter.

Tug McGraw entered the bottom of the ninth to close. Don Buford flew out to Jones in left. Paul Blair hit a ground ball that Harrelson ranged behind second to snare. Harrelson throw on the run was low, but scooped by Clendenon in time to retire Buford. Then, Frank Robinson was unable to check his swing on a McGraw screwball for the final out. The emotional McGraw threw his glove into the air and leapt into Jerry Grote’s bearhug as the rest of the team swarmed the pair. Miraculously, the team expected by the experts to finish behind the expansion Expos defied its past and others' expectations by slaying Goliath.

                     1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 -  R   H   E
New York             0  0  0  0  0  0  2  2  2 -  6   5   1
Baltimore            0  2  0  1  0  0  0  0  0 -  3   7   0


New York              AB  R  H BI  Avg  Baltimore             AB  R  H BI  Avg
T Agee CF              4  1  1  2 .174  D Buford LF            4  1  1  2 .273
W Garrett 3B           3  0  0  0 .000  P Blair CF             4  0  1  0 .136
 A Weis ph 3B          1  0  0  0 .143  F Robinson RF          4  0  0  0 .278
C Jones LF             3  2  2  0 .389  B Powell 1B            4  0  1  1 .250
A Shamsky RF           4  1  1  2 .333  B Robinson 3B          3  0  1  0 .143
 T McGraw P            0  0  0  0 .000  E Hendricks C          3  1  1  0 .143
K Boswell 2B           3  1  0  0 .000  D Johnson 2B           4  0  1  0 .136
E Kranepool 1B         2  0  0  0 .200  M Belanger SS          3  0  0  0 .056
 D Clendenon ph 1B     2  0  1  2 .211   C Motton ph           1  0  0  0 .333
J Grote C              4  0  0  0 .100   E Watt P              0  0  0  0 .000
B Harrelson SS         2  1  0  0 .056  J Palmer P             3  1  1  0 .200
G Gentry P             1  0  0  0 .000   P Richert P           0  0  0  0 .000
 J McAndrew P          0  0  0  0 .000   C Salmon ph SS        1  0  0  0 .250
 J Martin ph           1  0  0  0 .000
 N Ryan P              0  0  0  0 .000
 R Swoboda ph          1  0  0  0 .077
 R Taylor P            0  0  0  0 .000
 R Gaspar ph RF        1  0  0  0 .000
                      -- -- -- --                             -- -- -- --
Totals                32  6  5  6       Totals                34  3  7  3


New York                   IP   H   R  ER  BB  SO BFP  HB   D   T  HR   ERA
G Gentry                  3.2   6   3   3   3   3  21   1   2   0   0  3.17
J McAndrew                1.1   1   0   0   1   1   6   0   0   0   0  0.00
N Ryan (W 1-0)            2.0   0   0   0   0   2   6   0   0   0   0  4.50
R Taylor                  1.0   0   0   0   0   1   3   0   0   0   0  0.00
T McGraw (Sv 1)           1.0   0   0   0   0   1   3   0   0   0   0  0.00
Totals                    9.0   7   3   3   4   8  39   1   2   0   0

Baltimore                  IP   H   R  ER  BB  SO BFP  HB   D   T  HR   ERA
J Palmer                  6.1   3   2   2   0   5  22   0   1   0   1  2.91
P Richert (L 0-1)         1.2   1   2   2   1   3   7   0   0   0   1  4.90
E Watt                    1.0   1   2   2   3   1   7   0   0   1   0  4.15
Totals                    9.0   5   6   6   4   9  36   0   1   1   2


Left On Base: New York 3, Baltimore 9
Double Plays: none
Doubles: P Blair (2); C Jones (2); J Palmer (1)
Triples: D Clendenon (1)
Home Runs: T Agee (1); A Shamsky (2)
RBIs: T Agee 2(3); D Buford 2(4); B Powell (4); A Shamsky 2(4);
     D Clendenon 2(4)
Stolen Bases: none
Caught Stealing: none
Hit by Pitch: F Robinson (1)
Ground into Double Play: none 
Powell, McCovey named MVP;
Cuellar, Koosman win Cy Young
Slugging firstbaseman Boog Powell and Willie McCovey captured the Most
Valuable Player awards for 1969. Powell led the AL champion Baltimore Orioles 
with a .330 average, 35 HR, and 120 RBI. It may have been his clubs' final charge
to win the pennant that gave Powell the nod over Frank Howard of the surprising
Washington Senators. Howard tied Oakland's Reggie Jackson for the AL lead in 
home runs with 47. Giant firstbaseman Willie McCovey led all of baseball with 48
circuit clouts to go with a .324 average and a major league leading 130 RBI.
Mike Cuellar, obtained by Baltimore during the off-season from Houston, 
dominated the American League. Cuellar led the AL with a 25-5 record. His 
ERA of 1.96 was second in the league, and he also led the junior circuit with
20 complete games. In the NL, Jerry Koosman, the runner-up for Rookie of the 
Year last season, won the Cy Young in a surprise vote with an apparent New
York bias. Juan Marichal and Larry Dierker each posted magnificent seasons,
but perhaps it was Koosman's role in the Mets improbable pennant chase that 
captured the voters' imagination. Koosman, 22-7, posted a 1.93 ERA, second
behind Marichal in the NL.
Al Oliver of the Pittsburgh Pirates was named NL Rookie of the Year. Oliver 
contributed to the Pirate cause that fell just short in 1969. The 22 year old
first baseman led a Buc rookie crop with a .301 average, 17 HR and 87 RBI. 
Lou Piniella of the Kansas City Royals was named AL Rookie of the Year. 
Piniella, obtained from Seattle during the spring, batted .278 with 15 HR and 
85 RBI. Piniella edged Carlos May of the White Sox whose season was cut
short by a thumb injury received in military reserve duty in August.

 

 

 

FINAL

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EAST GB
Baltimore 109 52 -  
Detroit 90 72 19
WEST GB
Minnesota 97 65   -  
Oakland 88 74 9
EAST     GB
NewYork 100 62   -
Chicago 92 70   8
WEST     GB
Atlanta 93 69    -
S.F. 90 72   3

Final Standing of the Clubs

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East W L Pct. GB Streak Last 10 East W L Pct. GB Streak Last 10
Baltimore 112 50 .691   - W11 10-0 NewYork 98 64 .605  - W3 8-2
Washington 105 57 .648 7 W1 5-5 Pittsburgh 96 66 .593 2 W1 4-6
Boston 84 78 .519 28 L1 8-2 Chicago 93 69 .574 5 L2 4-6
Detroit 76 86 .469 36 L8 2-8 St.Louis 83 79 .512 15 W1 4-6
NewYork 75 86 .466 36 L1 2-8 Philadelphia 76 86 .469 22 L1 4-6
Cleveland 61 100 .379 50 W1 3-7 Montreal 56 106 .346 42 L1 5-5
  
West W L Pct. GB Streak Last 10 West W L Pct. GB Streak Last 10
Minnesota 104 58 .642  - W1 6-4 Atlanta 89 73 .549 - W1 7-3
Oakland 84 78 .519 20 W2 6-4 S.F. 87 75 .537 2 W1 8-2
Seattle 73 89 .451 31 L2 6-4 Houston 86 76 .531 3 W2 4-6
California 67 95 .414 37 L1 5-5 L.A. 85 77 .525 4 L2 3-7
Chicago 65 97 .401 39 L1 5-5 Cincinnati 77 85 .475 12 L1 5-5
K.C. 65 97 .401 39 W1 2-8 S.D. 46 116 .284 43 L1 2-8

BALL FOUR - winter 69/70

    "And then I thought of Jim O'Toole and I felt both strange and sad. When I took the cab to the airport in Cincinnati I got into a conversation with the driver and he said he'd played ball that summer against Jim O'Toole. He said O'Toole was pitching for the Ross Eversoles in the Kentucky Industrial League. He said O'Toole is all washed up. He doesn't have his fastball anymore but his control seems better than when he was with Cincinnati. I had to laugh at that. O'Toole won't be trying to sneak one over the corner on Willie Mays in the Kentucky Industrial League.
    Jim O'Toole and I started out even in the spring. He wound up on the Ross Eversoles and I with a new lease on life. And as I daydreamed of being the Fireman of the Year in 1970 I wondered what the dreams of Jim O'Toole are like these days. Then I thought, would I do that? When it's over for me, would I be hanging on with the Ross Eversoles? I went down deep and the answer I came up with was yes.
    Yes, I would. You see, you spend a good piece of your life gripping a baseball and in the end it turns out that it was the other way around all the time."


1999; A Second Time through the Order. This web site is not affiliated with any company, and is a simple labor of love.
APBA is a registered trademark of the APBA International, Inc. All baseball cards shown are copyright by the Topps Baseball Card Co. "Ball Four" written and copyright, 1970, 1981, 1990 by Jim Bouton; published by Macmillan General Reference. Catfish Hunter photo by Associated Press, 1968.